Why does everything have to start with the letter ‘i’?

Is it really an essential part of your technical PR campaign to stick the letter i on the start of every word? i-Is i-it i-really?The big news this week is that The Independent is launching a mini version, called i, which will be published every weekday and target readers who want a concise digest of the news. It will be edited by The Independent's editor-in-chief Simon Kelner, and will kick off on October 26 priced at 20p.

My only real problem is the world’s obsession with the letter ‘i’. iPhone, iPod and iPad are fine by me. They are all brands of Apple and thus need connecting. But why does everyone else have to do it? It’s like the obsession with putting the letter ‘e’ and a hyphen before every e-mail newsletter that was launched between 1998 and 2005; E-Talk, E-Today, E-Chat, E-LoadOfOldNonsense etc. And yes, I know the word Independent begins with an ‘i’ but the letter ‘i’ by itself isn’t a concise digest of the word Independent. Anyway, rant over. My apologies, I think I might be turning into a technical PR version of Ian Holloway.

In other news Building, the website covering news of major developments in the building industry has seen deputy news editor Andrew Hankinson leave. Furthermore, news and finance editor Tom Bill is leaving at the end of this week. Also in the building industry, Construction News has welcomed Jack Fidders as a reporter.

Meanwhile, The British Safety Council’s Safety Management magazine has appointed Amy Liptrot to work on news and features, replacing Catherine Burrell. Laura Milsom is the interim editor for the magazine.

Finally, Electronic Buyer’s News has returned as an online publication, EBN www.ebnonline.com. EBN was first published 30 years ago and originally focussed on the supply chain in the electronics industry. The focus of the re-launch of EBN’s is: “to create a community where electronics professionals can develop, generate, and sustain ideas that lead to the attainment of a smoother, more responsive, and less turbulent supply chain environment”. EBN’s team is editor in Chief Bolaji Ojo and community editor Barbara Jorgensen, two old hands from the electronics industry.

Richard Stone

Stone Junction is a cool technical PR agency based in Stafford. We work for all sorts of businesses, with a particular focus on technology, technical and engineering companies. We like being sent cake and biscuits by clients, journalists and prospects.

3 comments:

Philip Oakley said...

I suppose at least the Independent is trying something new rather than just sticking the website behind a paywall. I must admit I find 'quality' papers expensive and never have the time to read more than 10% of what's there.

Appears they are committed to the old ways as I read they are using a 'significant outdoor advertising campaign' to promote I (presumably in SE rather than ST postcodes?). Should I hold my breath for a Kindle or xPad version? I will no doubt buy a dead tree version when it comes out.

Richard Stone - technical PR consultant at Stone Junction said...

I agree with the 'time to read' issue. I tend to label at least 50% of the newsletter as recylcing the minute I buy it!

I wouldn't be surprised by a Kindle or iPad version though - this is where the Indie is heading I think.

Philip Oakley said...

I suppose at least the Independent is trying something new rather than just sticking the website behind a paywall. I must admit I find 'quality' papers expensive and never have the time to read more than 10% of what's there.

Appears they are committed to the old ways as I read they are using a 'significant outdoor advertising campaign' to promote I (presumably in SE rather than ST postcodes?). Should I hold my breath for a Kindle or xPad version? I will no doubt buy a dead tree version when it comes out.