Three new(ish) things you should know about Twitter

Three new(ish) things you should know about TwitterThe last few weeks have seen some interesting additions made to Twitter. The social networking site has added ‘who to follow’, ‘also followed by’ and ‘you both follow’ functions. This trio of new additions may well turn out to be particularly useful in the context of social media for industrial companies.

All three will make it easier to focus on only following relevant companies and individuals; reducing the amount of puff in your Twitter stream and increasing the likelihood of your message being seen by other professionals in your sector.

The also followed by function can be found at the top of another users profile when you view it from your account. This will tell you if any of the people you follow also follow the profile you are viewing. If the people following are interesting and relevant, the chances are this person will be also.

You both follow can be found on other user’s profiles above the main ‘following’ section. This serves a similar purpose to ‘also followed by’ but tells you a little bit more about the intentions of the profile you are looking at. After all, they have chosen to follow those individuals for a reason and the more profiles you follow in common, the more aligned your interests are likely to be.

Finally, who to follow can be found on the top right hand side of your own profile, beneath the bio. These are automatically generated suggestions made by Twitter, based on the demographic of the people you already follow.

These three new tools can all be really useful if you use them correctly. Remember though, you want to follow relevant people, not lots of people. Number of followers is just a vanity measure, relevance of followers is the only real metric.

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Richard Stone

Stone Junction is a cool technical PR agency based in Stafford. We work for all sorts of businesses, with a particular focus on technology, technical and engineering companies. We like being sent cake and biscuits by clients, journalists and prospects.

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